39 Comments
May 25, 2023Liked by Ashley Adamant

Morels, Chicken of the Woods, and others. My wife is from the mid-west where they're abundant. Hard to find around here so I bought spawn from an ad in a magazine, "planted" them, and now we have morels!

Expand full comment
May 25, 2023Liked by Ashley Adamant

we use raspberry leaves for a calming herbal for horses, particularly moody mares. I believe the are high in magnesium.

Expand full comment
May 25, 2023Liked by Ashley Adamant

Outstanding as always! I don’t know how you have time to research everything you write, but very appreciative. My garden doesn’t grow worth a hoot, but I now know I have plenty of weeds I can eat, seriously!😁. Thanks Ashley!!

Expand full comment

Amazing! Yes we have a big section of that ground ivy as well but I haven’t been able to identify it yet. Are the leaves and flowers edible?

Last year I made a salad from clover leaves and flowers, plantain leaves, dandelion leaves, salmon berries, jewelweed flowers, then made a dressing from olive oil, honey and cumin - delish!

Expand full comment
May 25, 2023Liked by Ashley Adamant

I would also like to know more about the linden leaves. I also saw a post on ig about using the seeds as a chocolate substitute and I’d like to try that.

I’m in the suburbs of Milwaukee and I find a lot of ramps, pheasant back mushrooms, nettle, brown mustard, field garlic, motherwort, dandelions, burdock, milk thistle, yarrow, black cap raspberries, walnuts, river grapes, may apples, ground berries (rarely), violets, wild rose, acorn, lambs quarters, purslane, plantain, knotweed, mares tail, dock seed, Dames rocket, false Solomon seal, chestnut, trout lilies, and clover. Many of which I don’t think I could eat because of my location 😫

Expand full comment

I have only recently begun eating Japanese maple leaves - they are very good when new and tender! It isn't a tree native to my region, but folks are planting them ornamentally.

Expand full comment
May 25, 2023Liked by Ashley Adamant

I love to make Sumac tea and its great to ferment as well here in Portland there are a few trees. It's such a stately tree and I remember it being called Staghorn Sumac for obvious reasons back in Michigan. It is very prevalent there in the cooler upper half of Michigan.

Expand full comment
May 25, 2023Liked by Ashley Adamant

Love this blog!

Please tell more about using the linden leaves. Raw shredded or torn in salads? Pureed and in a sour cream sauce for other veggies? Steamed with cheese sauce?

Expand full comment
May 25, 2023Liked by Ashley Adamant

Amazing post! My kids are going to love this! Thank you for writing your articles. I really appreciate them/ Mikaela Cannon

Expand full comment
May 25, 2023Liked by Ashley Adamant

Amazing lessons for the little ones.

Expand full comment
May 25, 2023Liked by Ashley Adamant

Ashley, I enjoy all your email and the knowledge that you share, thank you Carolyn

Expand full comment
Jun 1, 2023Liked by Ashley Adamant

Hi Ashley...this was absolutely wonderful! I have different things growing here in Oz than you do, but some are similar....and I LOVED the triceratops's cake! Well done! Thanks again, many hugs, Barbara from Sydney in Oz xoxoxo

Expand full comment
May 30, 2023Liked by Ashley Adamant

What a great article! Your little ones are very blessed to have a Mom with your knowledge. Thanks for posting.

Expand full comment
May 26, 2023Liked by Ashley Adamant

Pretty big fan of purslane and shepherd's purse, since it's easier to feed those to the uninitiated.

Getting the kids to eat the weeds is a big victory.

Glechoma is more hard core for the bitters lovers, kind of on the level of bitter melon.

Expand full comment
May 26, 2023Liked by Ashley Adamant

I hope your children grow up knowing how blessed they are in having you as a parent and guide!

Expand full comment

What a beautiful story of serendipitous 'rolling with it' to get young'uns on board. <3

Expand full comment